5 tips to increase the number of fruits your children eat

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tips to increase the number of fruits your children eat

Forming healthy habits in children from an early age is vital, not only for their health as kids but for the rest of their lives.

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Naazneen Khan, Health and Wellness Manager at Nestlé South Africa shares a few healthy routine ideas that will put you and your kids on track to leading a happier and healthier lifestyle.

Here are 5 tips to increase the number of fruits your children eat on a daily basis:

1. Add variety. Buy fruits that are dried, frozen, and canned (in water or 100% juice) as well as fresh fruit, so that you always have a supply on hand.

SEE ALSO: 5 ways to prepare your fruits & veggies for effective weight loss

2. Keep visible reminders. Keep a bowl of whole fruit on the table or in the refrigerator so that it’s easy for your children to reach them.

3. Don’t forget the fibre. Use whole or cut-up fruit, rather than juice, to benefit from the dietary fibre provided by fruits. Fruit juice, even 100%, can add unnecessary kilojoules and often lacks the fibre your children need.

4. Include fruit at breakfast. Top up your cereal with bananas, peaches, or strawberries; add grated apple to pancakes or try fruit mixed with fat-free or low-fat yoghurt.

SEE ALSO: 5 healthy food mistakes you could be making

5. Experiment with fruit at dinner. Add crushed pineapple to coleslaw, or include orange sections. Choose a fresh fruit salad as a dessert.

Great snack ideas: 

  • Get into the habit of eating fruit during this time. Fruits provide vital nutrients such as potassium, dietary fibre, vitamin C and folate (folic acid), which helps produce and maintain new cells and is great for child growth and development.
  • On average, children aged between nine and thirteen need approximately 28 grams of fibre a day in order to assist digestion, regulate bowel movements and maintain balanced blood sugar levels.
  • Berries and apples are fantastic snack options as they both contain high levels of fibre. One cup of blueberries or one large apple has approximately 4 to 6 grams of fibre.