The man leading SA hip hop from the back

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Slikour chats about the early struggles of running his website and how he worked past them.

Fri, 19 Aug 2016 11:27:04 +0000

Famously known as Slikour, Siya Metane needs no introduction. He broke onto the music scene as part of the legendary hip-hop crew Skwatta Kamp, capturing the imagination of many fans. Now, Slikour is involved in driving the music forward behind the scenes and introducing new talent through his website, Slikour onLife.

1.What made you start Slikour onLife?

I wanted a platform where I can post about my interests. It started as an idea where I wanted to showcase up-and-coming local talent,  as well as some of the hip hop I follow internationally.

2. What was the reception when you started, compared to now?

I wasn’t worried about the reception because I had decided that it was what I wanted to do, regardless of whether people liked it or not. The first site I did was called ventilation, but the country wasn’t ready then. It felt like a gap I needed to fill.

3. We understand that you struggled with the commercial aspect of your website in the beginning; what did you battle with exactly and how did you turn that around?

Media-buying agencies prefer to work with partners they already know. I had to position myself differently from all the media platforms, and also offer more than a banner. I figured I could help my clients with more than just a banner because my marketing experience allows me to pitch strategically. In fact, I read the other day that publishing companies internationally, such as New York Times and E News use the same strategy I’ve been pitching to clients.

4. You’re currently in the process of creating OnLife Networks; what is that project about?

As my site grew, I started having a vision of growing more niche platforms that would resonate with different markets. I also knew that the service I offer to clients would need to be supported by a proper digital structure. I started looking for partners who would help me with my vision of creating more platforms, and also have a wider and more efficient offering for my clients.

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5. How do you balance your family life and other ventures?

My partner and son don’t mind me working, as long as I stay committed to the time we’ve set aside for each other. I’m lucky because they understand the kind of work I do.

6. Can we expect another Slikour album in the future? If so, when?

I had to decide whether to get on the mic and talk about myself or go behind the scenes and give others a voice. Our culture in music, arts and fashion is more important than me trying to be in the forefront.

7. What are you currently listening to?

DJ Khaled, Sean Pages, Bryson Tiller, Bj the Chicago Kid, Tory Lanez, Snoh Aalegra, DJ Vigi and Cassper Nyovest. I also play most of the artists that send us music.

8. You’ve been in the hip-hop game for a while now; what do you think about the music coming from young MCs at the moment?

Hip-hop is not about the music; it’s about what it’s doing for the youth. The sound is an end product that’s been evolving since the late 1970s, and that sound has had an impact on different youth.

9. Is hip hop giving kids hope today?

Yes! If the young MCs are using this culture to find a way to better their lives, then I’m okay with it.

10. What motto do you live by?

No one’s truth is yours; stay true to yours.